Map Gallery

Maps of Performances

Frequency of Performances by City
Map of Milhaud's Music by Genre

What is this?

This map displays performances of Milhaud’s music between 1922-1933 broken down by genre.

How do I use it?

Click on the layers button in the upper right-hand corner to toggle between genres. Select which you want to see displayed on the map. Use the legend to see which color of marker represents each genre.

 

What does this tell us?

This map examines the spread of performances of different genres of Milhaud’s music. From this map, we are able to determine that Milhaud’s most frequently performed works were his orchestral works. We can also see that Milhaud’s Chamber Music was the genre that had the furthest reach geographically. Milhaud’s chamber music was even played in the USSR. What can this trend tell us about musical tastes of the period? To have such a far reach geographically, Milhaud’s chamber music was played by several different chamber groups (Pro Arte Quartet, Kolisch Quartet). How does his connection to these various groups and their subsequent performance of his music relate to the changes relationships between performers and composers from the period?

 

 

Chronological Map of Milhaud's Performances

What is this?

 

A map of performances of Milhaud’s works from 1922-1933 chronologically spaced out.

How do I use it?

Click and drag the time slider at the bottom of the map or simply click the play button to see the dispersion of Milhaud’s works in different years.

What does this tell us?

The addition of a chronological function allows us to more deeply examine trends that we see developing over time. Using this function, one can observe an Eastern shift in performances of Milhaud from 1926-1931. What does this Eastern shift tell us? It confirms that Milhaud, an intensely French composer, was often performed in countries outside of France. It also lends credibility to the idea that Milhaud’s popularity in other European countries (specifically Germany) helped contribute to his rising success in France.

Map of Milhaud's Top Ten Pieces

What is this map?

This comparative map includes ten different layers, each representing the amount of performances that we were able to find for ten of Milhaud’s pieces. They represent the top ten pieces that had the most performances recorded in the spreadsheet.

How do I use it?

Toggle between layers, either viewing them all at once, or isolating one layer at a time by checking or unchecking a layer in the legend. Click on a specific point for more information. Sometimes, when you think you are clicking on just one point, there are several in the same spot. Click on the right arrow in the top right hand corner of the pop-up to see all the performances in that area.

What does this map tell us?

Several interesting patterns and questions arise from this research. First of all, why did these ten pieces yield the most performances in our research? And why are most of them stage or theater works? Does this suggest that Milhaud’s work was best received alongside a visual component?

The map itself also reveals some interesting trends. Right away it is clear that Milhaud’s work was performed in a very wide variety of cities, especially in Northern Europe. This map seems to suggest that the scope of Milhaud’s music stretched far beyond the boundaries of the French border. Whether this was as a result of the music’s popularity abroad, or of self-promotion, is a research question that may be worth pursuing from this map.

Some piece-specific trends bring us to other questions. For instance, there are no performances of Les Choëphores that appear outside of Paris, Brussels, and Antwerp. There are also eighteen performances of Salade in Paris, compared to only five outside of Paris. For the other eight pieces, the performances spread much farther outside of France. Why didn’t these two pieces spread further beyond the French border? Were they received less warmly abroad than others? Or was this simply a hole in our research? The map also shows that Le Pauvre Matelot was the most widespread of all the pieces on the map. So, was it the most popular abroad, or did Milhaud push to have it performed the most? These questions and more show how maps can emphasize new patterns and lead to new scholarship.

Map of French and German Sources
Frequency of Performances by Country
Map of Milhaud's Letters

What is this map: This is a map displaying the various places where Darius Milhaud often times wrote letters to his various correspondents as well as where these correspondents were located.

What does this map tell us: As you zoom in this map, you can see that most of these letters were written in France or sent to France. The majority of the letters written from France were for the most part written by Darius Milhaud, who spent the majority of his life living in Aix-en-Provence (where he was born) as well as in Paris, more precisely at 14 Rue de Clichy.

We can also see that the second larger count of letters on this map is in Vienna. This is mainly due to the fact that Milhaud directed a lot of his letters to Emil Hertzka or to a musical publishing firm called Universal Editions. (see Milhaud’s Network Map below for more information) .

As you explore this map, you can also click on the various markers to find out more about these letters, who wrote them/received them as well as their content.

You can find a link to this map here

 

Maps of Milhaud’s Travels

Map of Milhaud's First US Tour

What is this?

The Story Map feature in ArcGIS is the best way to present a discrete, related set of chronological data in an engaging and clear way. Of all of Milhaud’s travels, we were able to put the destinations of three trips in chronological order: his honeymoon, his first tour to the U.S., and his second tour to the U.S. Presenting these three trips in three Story Maps allows the reader to view the data in chronological order and follow along in Milhaud’s footsteps. This is a map of Milhaud’s first tour to the United States.

How do I use it?

Use the arrows to begin your tour and toggle between different tour destinations.

Map of Milhaud's Second US Tour

What is this?

The Story Map feature in ArcGIS is the best way to present a discrete, related set of chronological data in an engaging and clear way. Of all of Milhaud’s travels, we were able to put the destinations of three trips in chronological order: his honeymoon, his first tour to the U.S., and his second tour to the U.S. Presenting these three trips in three Story Maps allows the reader to view the data in chronological order and follow along in Milhaud’s footsteps. This is a map of Milhaud’s second tour to the United States.

How do I use it?

Use the arrows to begin your tour and toggle between different tour destinations.

Map of Milhaud's Honeymoon

What is this?

The Story Map feature in ArcGIS is the best way to present a discrete, related set of chronological data in an engaging and clear way. Of all of Milhaud’s travels, we were able to put the destinations of three trips in chronological order: his honeymoon, his first tour to the U.S., and his second tour to the U.S. Presenting these three trips in three Story Maps allows the reader to view the data in chronological order and follow along in Milhaud’s footsteps. This is a map of Milhaud’s honeymoon.

How do I use it?

Use the arrows to begin your tour and toggle between different destinations.

Comparative Chronological Map of Milhaud's Travels and Performances

What is this?

This map contains color-coded data points of Milhaud’s travels and performances of his works from 1922 to 1933. The map is meant to explore the possible influence of Milhaud’s travel destinations on the locations of his performances or vice versa, via the spatial and temporal juxtaposition of Milhaud’s travels and performances.

How do I use it?

Click the play button to watch an animation comparing Milhaud’s performances and travels. To view a specific date range, drag the black section of the chronological slider to encapsulate the date range you are looking for.

Milhaud Letters Network Graph

What is this Graph: This is a graph that displays the circle of friends and acquaintances of Darius Milhaud. After going through 297 unpublished letters written by/to Milhaud, we made this map in order to visualize who where the people that Milhaud often times wrote to or received letters from.

What does this graph show: This graph shows that Louis Durey, Emil Hertzka and Universal Editions were for the most part the people with whom Darius Milhaud communicated, in this collection of letters. Moreover, it reveals the variety of Milhaud’s circle of friends, including people such as Arthur Honegger and Francis Poulenc, who were both part of Milhaud’s group Les Six.

Who were some of these people: 

  • Louis Durey: He was a French composer and colleague of Darius Milhaud who helped bring together members of Les Six, when he asked Darius Milhaud to write a piano piece for the group’s album entitled L’Album des Six.
  • Emil Hertzka: He was a music publisher, widely known for publishing some of the most influential European albums and musical works in the 20th century. He edited and published a lot of Milhaud’s works such as his Sypmphonie de Chambre No. 5
  • Universal Editions: Located in Vienna, Universal Editions is a classical music publishing firm. It published the works of various noteworthy musicians and composers such as Darius Milhaud, Gustave Mahler and Arnold Schoenberg.